Book Series

Author: Scott Whitaker

Railway Track through countryside

Volume Four ~ SA, NT, TAS and WA

Railway Hotels of Australia

The final chapter in Scott Whitaker’s four-volume study of every Railway Hotel that trades or once traded in Australia is coming to a close. Volume Four of Railway Hotels of Australia covers South Australia, Northern Territory, Tasmania and Western Australia.

The book contains a wealth of information on the history of railways across SA, NT, TAS and WA, and explores the social, economic and political themes that helped to shape the state. It has been produced to the same high-quality standards as the previous three books.

Consisting of 312 pages in length, this hardcover book contains hundreds of historic and contemporary images on high quality art paper, and includes a range of advertisements and anecdotes that add interest and establish the mood of the era.

Many readers will find it enjoyable, from railway and hotel hobbyists, publicans, as well as people who are interested in local or social history, and architecture.

▪ 300 pages
▪Landscope Format
▪ 210mm x 297mm
▪ Full Colour
▪ Hard Cover
▪ 87 Hotels

Railway Hotels of Australia: Volume Four - South Australia, Northern Territory, Tasmania and Western Australia Cover

New
Release

RRP: $70
Volume Four is out now! Released end of April 2019 it has a limited run of only 600 copies, so order now to secure your copy.

Order Volume Four

$70 (+ $15 Postage) – Australia Wide Only

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All books ordered direct will be personally signed by the author, Scott Whitaker





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*Regrettably, international postage is unavailable.

Book Sample

Railway Hotels of South Australia, Northern Territory, Tasmania and Western Australia

Page 8 of Volume Four ~ South Australia, Northern Territory, Tasmania and Western Australia: Bowden Railway Tavern

Bowden Railway Hotel

“… The Railway Tavern was established on the corner of Drayton and Second Streets (allotment 204) after William Drayton was granted a publicans’ licence at the Hindmarsh Licencing Court on 12 March 1855…” – p.8

Page 18 of Railway Hotels of Australia Volume Four ~ South Australia, Northern Territory, Tasmania and Western Australia: Freeling Railway Hotel

Freeling Railway Hotel

“… When a pair of itinerant workers, James Harvey and Walter Hill, adjourned to Carl Koch’s Railway Hotel in 1910, they got a little more than they bargained for when an over-zealous police officer pounted …” – p.18

Page 82 of Railway Hotels of Australia Volume Four ~ South Australia, Northern Territory, Tasmania and Western Australia: Katherine Railway Hotel

Katherine Railway Hotel

“… Throughout his tenure at the Railway Hotel, O’Shea presided over a very popular hotel that was a favourite for travellers, both professional and tourist…” – p.82

Page 110 of Railway Hotels of Australia Volume Four ~ South Australia, Northern Territory, Tasmania and Western Australia: Hobart Railway Pier Hotel

Hobart Railway Pier Hotel

“… When John Cross transferred the licence of the Phoenix Hotel to John Hitchens on 7 May 1917, the incoming publican applied to change the sign of his hotel to the Railway Pier Hotel, a request which was approved by licensing authorities at the same hearing…” – p.110

Page 221 of Railway Hotels of Australia Volume Four ~ South Australia, Northern Territory, Tasmania and Western Australia: Suburban Railways and Street Tramways of Kalgoorlie-Boulder

Suburban Railways and Street Tramways of Kalgoorlie-Boulder

“… The map at left (not to scale) shows the once extensive railway (as at 1941) and tramway network (at its greatest extent) that served the people of Kalgoorlie-Boulder….” – p.221

Page 226 of Railway Hotels of Australia Volume Four ~ South Australia, Northern Territory, Tasmania and Western Australia: Kanowna Railway Bar Hotel

Kanowna Railway Bar Hotel

“… Railway communication reached Kanowna on 2 December 1897 in the form of a short branch line from Kalgoorlie. The line was operated by the contractors until it was officially handed over to the government on 15 June 1898….” – p.226

“… I congratulate Scott for achieving this substantial compilation, and commend the book to a wide readership: railway and hotel hobbyists, publicans, people with an interest in local or social history, or with an interest in architecture. Many readers may be enthused to seek and sample survivors, and join the spirits of patrons and publicans from the early years…”
Roderick B Smith, retired editor Rail News Victoria

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